Travel La Crosse the Waterfront

With La Crosse being right on the Mississippi River, it was a hotspot for fur traders from all over that came to the area to find their fortune and many of those fur traders helped start some of the early settlements in La Crosse.

A hunting party on the steamboat White Beaver, circa 1900. The boat belonged to G. L. Winslow, who can be seen sitting on the wood pile. His son, E. M. Winslow, is on the left. -- COURTESY UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-LA CROSSE / #17260

A hunting party on the steamboat White Beaver, circa 1900. The boat belonged to G. L. Winslow, who can be seen sitting on the wood pile. His son, E. M. Winslow, is on the left.

COURTESY UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-LA CROSSE / #17260

The rivers that run along La Crosse provided a great form of transportation and helped much of the commerce in the area create what the city is now.

The steamer G.W. Hill at the La Crosse waterfront, circa 1912. To the right is Thomas P. Benton and Sons Manufacturing and Electrical Supply Company. -- COURTESY UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-LA CROSSE / #36361

The steamer G.W. Hill at the La Crosse waterfront, circa 1912. To the right is Thomas P. Benton and Sons Manufacturing and Electrical Supply Company.

COURTESY UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-LA CROSSE / #36361

See more of history of La Crosse in the La Crosse Tribune's new hardcover pictorial history book La Crosse Memories.

La Crosse Memories: The Early Years Cover
La Crosse Tribune presents La Crosse Memories: The Early Years

$44.95

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